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TOWN CHRONOLOGY  


CHRONOLOGY OF LONGMEADOW, MASSACHUSETTS HISTORY

SPRINGFIELD PERIOD (1636-1783)

1630
and after

The Puritan migration from England to North America, with most settlements at Boston and vicinity. First settlers of Springfield came from the Boston area, led by William Pynchon of Roxbury.

1636

"Agawam Plantation" purchased from the Agawam Indians, and founded by William Pynchon. Part of this land (called "Masacksic" by the Indians, meaning "the long meddowe) is set aside as "common land" for grazing of cattle.

1641

"Agawam Plantation" is renamed Springfield after Pynchon's home in England.

1645

Common land in the "long meddowe" was divided into individually-owned farm lots.

1649

Erection of houses began in the "long meddowe."

1651

William Pynchon returns to England; leadership of the Springfield Plantation assumed by his son John.

1675

The great Indian uprising known as King Philip's War began; Springfield attacked and most buildings were burned.

1676

Massacre of the John Keep family by Indians at Pecousic Brook (near the present King Philip's Stockade) while walking from "longmeddowe" to religious services in Springfield.

1695

A great flood inundated the "long meddowe."

1703

John Pynchon, Springfield's leader and son of the founder, died.

The Springfield Town Meeting granted permission for the "longmeddowe" residents "to build upon the hill eastward." (along Longmeadow St. around the present-day Green).

1713

Longmeadow residents granted "precinct" status within Springfield, with permission to establish their own religious society.

1714

Construction, in the middle of the "commons" or Green, begins on the meeting house; the building is used for all religious, social, and political activities.

1716

Rev. Stephen Williams ordained as the first minister of Springfield's "Second Religious Society" (The First Church).

1741

The "Great Awakening," a profound and emotional religious revival, occurred.

1744

Beginning of French and Indian Wan. Longmeadow men engaged in battle of Louisburg, Crown Point and Lake George - Stephen Williams served as chaplain.

1750

First houses were built around this time in the eastern part of Longmeadow (later called the East Village, or Parish, and eventually the independent town of East Longmeadow).

1767

"Raising Day" for the second meeting house, replacing the original.

1775

April 21: Longmeadow farmers joined Springfield's Minuteman company to assist at Lexington and Concord.

1782

Rev. Stephen Williams died.

AN AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL TOWN (1783-1894)

1783

Longmeadow was established as an independent town.

1786

Richard Salter Storrs was installed as the second minister of First Church. (His home is now the "Storrs House.")

1790

First Federal Census: Longmeadow's population is 738.

1819

Major typhus epidemic, resulting in many child and adult deaths, including Rev. Storrs

1829

Residents of the "East" Village established their own parish and meeting house. (now East Longmeadow)

1830's

All the taverns on the Green were temporarily closed in the Temperance Crusade that swept the country.

1835

Longmeadow Maternal Association founded.

1844

A Hartford to Springfield railroad was completed; the station in the meadows was open until the early 20th century.

1850

Total Longmeadow population has reached 1250: the "East" Village is 750, the "West" Village (now Longmeadow) is 500. The greater growth of the East Village was based upon expanding agriculture and the famous redstone quarries.

1868

St. Mary's Parish established.

1869

The first May Breakfast was held at First Church.

1874

The First Church was moved from the middle of the Green to its present location.

1883

Centennial observance on the Green.

1894

Longmeadow was split into two towns: Longmeadow (the "West" Village) with 570 people; and East Longmeadow (the "East" Village), with 1613 people.

 LONGMEADOW: A SUBURB (1894- )

1895

First public water system established.

1896

Trolley line is extended from Springfield to Enfield along Longmeadow St.

1899

Longmeadow Historical Society founded.

1910

"South Park Estates" in the northwestern corner of town, across from Forest Park, was developed as the first suburban housing tract in Longmeadow.

1916

Storrs Library established in building that is now behind current Library building.

1919

American Legion Post 175 (Albert T. Wood Post) formed- now occupied by Council on Aging.

1920

The Community House was built by First Church on Church-owned land police force was established and housed in Council on Aging building.

1921

St. Andrew's Parish established.

1923

Community House was leased to the town, the Church reserving its use on "the Lord's Day." Fire department established as a volunteer system, housed at what is now Longmeadow Garage.

1924

Christian Science Church established.

1927

The town bought the Community House from First Church.

1928

The Longmeadow School Department was established separately from the "union" with East Longmeadow, Hampden, and Wilbraham..

1930

Town Offices building was erected on Williams St

1931

St. Mary's Church completed.

1938

Hurricane destroyed many of the great elm trees on the Green.

1941

Bus service replaced the trolleys.

1955

Longmeadow Senior High School opens.

1957 

Blueberry Hill School is built.

1959

Williams Middle School is built.

1960

Police and Fire Department buildings completed.

1975

Beth Israel Synagogue

2003

Population is 15,397


Alfred L. Wood/ Michael F. Gelinas       



Longmeadow Historical Society

697 Longmeadow Street
Longmeadow, MA 01106
(413) 567-3600
LongmeadowHS@gmail.com
 
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